605-964-8200|lakotayouth@gmail.com

Art Internship Program

Teen Art Interns Complete Architecture & Design Course

On April 27-29, the Cheyenne River Youth Project® welcomed Boulder, Colorado-based Pyatt Studio to its Eagle Butte campus for a three-day, intensive “Introduction to Architecture & Design” workshop. Rob Pyatt, principal and design director, and fellow designer Walt Pourier spent three days with 13 teen art interns who currently are pursuing their arts education through CRYP’s Waniyetu Wowapi (Winter Count) Lakota Arts Institute.

The intensive workshop familiarized the interns with architectural and design thinking, and it provided critical instruction in a variety of representational tools and media, including freehand drawing and basic model-making techniques. All interns received an official Certificate of Completion from Pyatt Studio and CRYP.

During their three days with Pyatt and Pourier, the interns developed local, relevant and personally meaningful design projects, and they explored aspects of architecture and design that aligned with their individual interests. They also learned about design research, communicating design ideas through drawing, testing designs through physical models, working collaboratively and sharing their design ideas with others.

Read More

CRYP Hosts First Peoples Fund’s Rolling Rez Arts

On April 18-20, the Cheyenne River Youth Project® welcomed the First Peoples Funds’ Rolling Rez Arts mobile unit to the Cheyenne River Lakota Nation. Visiting artist Wade Patton and First Peoples Fund Coordinator Bryan Parker spent three evenings with the nonprofit youth organization’s teen arts interns, providing valuable instruction in multiple mediums.

On the first evening, the interns cut up pages from a ledger book and constructed a collage. Then, they either painted or used pastels to create unique visuals incorporating the ledger paper.

“The teens blended old ledger paper with contemporary images and ideas,” said Julie Garreau, CRYP’s executive director. “It was fascinating to see the beautiful and interesting ways they bridged the gap between the old and the new.”

Read More

March Hall of Fame: Genevieve Iron Lightning

When the Cheyenne River Youth Project designed its innovative teen internship program, it created four distinct internship areas to appeal to a diverse range of interests. Yet staff members are discovering that many teens choose to participate in all of them. Once the kids start learning, it seems, they don’t want to stop.

Genevieve Iron Lightning, 16, is one of those kids. She has participated in all four internships—sustainable agriculture, social enterprise, art, and wellness—and she says she appreciates the many different skills she has acquired through those opportunities.

“In the Keya Cafe, I liked making drinks and stocking the pastries and desserts,” she recalls. “The social enterprise internship taught me a lot of customer service skills, like how to address people and deal with issues.

“I also liked learning about public speaking,” she says of her internship experiences at CRYP. “I’m very vocal already, so it’s helpful to learn how to really draw people into what you’re saying.”

Read More
  • Wellness Interns 2
    Permalink Gallery

    Attention, Teens: Come to Midnight Basketball and Learn More About CRYP’s Internship Program!

Attention, Teens: Come to Midnight Basketball and Learn More About CRYP’s Internship Program!

The Cheyenne River Youth Project® is inviting local youth to attend Midnight Basketball at the Cokata Wiconi (Center of Life) teen center on Friday, Feb. 24 and Thursday, Mar. 2. Not only will 13- to 18-year-olds have the always-welcome opportunity to play their favorite sport and hang out with friends, they’ll be able to learn more about the nonprofit youth organization’s innovative teen internship program.

On these two evenings, Midnight Basketball will incorporate a recruitment station where teens can get more information about upcoming internships in wellness, sustainable agriculture, social enterprise and the arts.

“We’re looking forward to meeting with kids who might not be fully aware of what we offer here,” said Tammy Granados, CRYP’s youth programs director. “Through the internship program, teens can earn their own money, earn valuable certifications, and gain real-life job experience.”

Read More
  • Ray Dupris 1
    Permalink Gallery

    Waniyetu Wowapi Lakota Arts Institute Takes Shape; CRYP Seeks Artistic Director and Lakota Mentors/Teachers

Waniyetu Wowapi Lakota Arts Institute Takes Shape; CRYP Seeks Artistic Director and Lakota Mentors/Teachers

The Cheyenne River Youth Project® is moving ahead quickly with its plans for the innovative new Waniyetu Wowapi (Winter Count) Lakota Arts Institute. Not only has it embarked on a widespread search for a full-time artistic director to manage LAI operations and Lakota artists to serve as instructors and youth mentors, it is already hosting art classes focused on traditional Lakota crafts and is laying the groundwork for additional classes and camps.

The nonprofit youth organization has offered arts instruction to 4- to 12-year-olds throughout its nearly 30-year history, and to teens for the last decade. Now, thanks to grants from the ArtPlace America National Creative Placemaking Fund and NEA Our Town Technical Assistance, CRYP finally has the resources to realize its vision of a multidisciplinary, community-based arts institute at its Eagle Butte campus.

In the beginning, LAI will continue to support students in graffiti and street art education, a process that began more than two years ago with dedicated art classes and the inaugural RedCan graffiti jam. It also will teach traditional art skills, such as drawing and painting, and it will place a high priority on traditional Lakota arts.

Read More

Art Interns Learn Traditional Lakota Arts This Fall

This fall, interns at the Cheyenne River Youth Project® had the opportunity to learn traditional Lakota arts at the nonprofit organization’s Cokata Wiconi (Center of Life) teen center. Classes, which included hide tanning and jewelry making, were made possible through a First Nations Youth & Culture Fund grant from the First Nations Development Institute.

Thirteen teen interns attended the hide-tanning class. On the first day, they scraped a deer hide to remove all the fur, boiled the brains, and learned the process of brain tanning. The next day, they scraped the brains off the deer hide, and then they rubbed and worked the hide until it was soft.

Nineteen interns attended the jewelry-making class. They painted on buckskin and learned to fashion the material into bracelets, necklaces and rings.

Read More

CRYP Graduates 184 Teen Interns

In the nearly three years since the Cheyenne River Youth Project® launched its innovative teen internship program at the Cokata Wiconi (Center of Life) teen center, 184 teenagers have completed internships in sustainable agriculture, social enterprise, wellness and art. Not only have these young people gained valuable skills that will serve them well all their lives, they are having a lasting impact on the Cheyenne River reservation’s economy.

For CRYP, it’s all about the development of the Lakota workforce—and building healthy, resilient, well-rounded adults in the process. Since 2014, the nonprofit youth organization has invested $36,950 in Cheyenne River’s teenagers, providing instruction, mentorship, workshops, certifications, real-life job experience and wages. According to Julie Garreau, executive director, that’s making a difference on more than one level.

“When the kids earn their own money, they’re able to buy things they need,” Garreau explained. “Even more importantly, they’re thinking about how to earn more money, and about their own futures. One teen used his stipend to buy a lawn mower and started providing local lawn-care services. Others have purchased musical equipment. It’s really exciting to see that.”

Read More

September Hall of Fame: Randi Little Star

In the years since we launched our Cokata Wiconi (Center of Life) teen center’s internship programs, we’ve learned two very important things. Cheyenne River’s teens crave opportunities to learn new job and life skills, and they welcome mentorships that inspire them and encourage them to imagine all the possibilities for the future.

Some of these teens desire and appreciate these experiences so much, they sign up for every internship we offer. Randi Little Star, 16, is one of them. This active 10th-grader has completed Sustainable Agriculture, Social Enterprise and Wellness internships, and she’s currently working her way through the Waniyetu Wowapi (Winter Count) Teen Arts Internship.

“I signed up for all the internships because I like helping people, and I really wanted to gain more experience in all these different areas,” Randi says. “I’d like to do even more, because I enjoy the tasks, and I love learning new things every day.”

Read More
  • Exhibit Prep 4
    Permalink Gallery

    2nd & 3rd Cohorts of Teen Art Interns Prepare for Upcoming RedCan Exhibition

2nd & 3rd Cohorts of Teen Art Interns Prepare for Upcoming RedCan Exhibition

The Cheyenne River Youth Project® has announced that its second and third cohorts of teen art interns are preparing a formal exhibition of their work, which will be open to the public. Their artwork will be on display from Wednesday, July 6 to Saturday, July 9 in the Cokata Wiconi (Center of Life) teen center’s classroom.

CRYP is inviting all the interns’ families to attend a special opening reception and honoring ceremony at Cokata Wiconi on Wednesday evening, which also is the first night of the eagerly anticipated RedCan graffiti jam. Guests may view the teens’ framed artwork and enjoy refreshments while mingling with youth project staff and visiting artists.

Also on hand will be Peyton Scott Russell from Minnesota’s Twin Cities, a returning RedCan artist and the lead instructor for CRYP’s innovative, 18-month-old art internship program. This comprehensive program gives Cheyenne River teens the opportunity to build their skills in a variety of artistic disciplines, including traditional art, graffiti art, and street art.

Read More
  • 0903151253
    Permalink Gallery

    Scape Martinez Will Lead Summer Graffiti Art Education Camp on June 27-30

Scape Martinez Will Lead Summer Graffiti Art Education Camp on June 27-30

The Cheyenne River Youth Project® has announced that acclaimed San Jose, California-based artist and writer Scape Martinez will lead a summer graffiti art education camp at its Eagle Butte campus from Monday, June 27 to Thursday, June 30. Martinez has chosen the theme “Creativity is Contagious” for the four-day, hands-on, intensive multimedia and graffiti art camp, which is open to all teens.

The camp will begin with the basic principles of graffiti art—letters, names, words and their modification. Through lessons and prompts, Martinez will encourage the students to explore their own identities and creativity in a safe, supportive environment, and the teens will have the opportunity to discuss their work, exchange ideas and offer respectful, reassuring critiques.

“This is an important opportunity for our teen interns to take their arts education and skills to the next level,” said Julie Garreau, CRYP’s executive director. “These are intensive sessions. Each session is five hours, and the interns will receive a rigorous arts education in a truly salon-style environment. And, not only will they continue to find their own unique voices and methods of expressing themselves, they’ll take part in group discussion, research and critique, which are all important parts of the process for art students and working artists.”

Read More