605-964-8200|lakotayouth@gmail.com

Art

Coming in 2017: The Waniyetu Wowapi Lakota Arts Institute

The Cheyenne River Youth Project’s eagerly anticipated Waniyetu Wowapi (Winter Count) Lakota Arts Institute will fully take shape in the new year, thanks to just-announced funding from ArtPlace America’s 2016 National Creative Placemaking Fund. The nonprofit, grassroots youth organization is one of just 29 projects chosen, from a field of nearly 1,400 applicants.

ArtPlace America’s National Creative Placemaking Fund is a highly competitive national program —funding 2 percent of initial applications—that invests money in communities across the country in which artists, arts organizations, and arts and culture activity will help drive community development change in the sectors of agriculture and food; economic development; education and youth; environment and energy; health, housing; immigration; public safety; transportation; or workforce development.

“Creative Placemaking seeks the full and robust integration of arts, culture, and community-engaged design into the decisions that define the ebb and flow of community life. These grant recipients embody what this looks like at its most effective best,” said Rip Rapson, president and CEO of The Kresge Foundation and chair of the ArtPlace President’s Council. “The sheer volume of applications for these grants suggests the growing updraft of creative placemaking efforts throughout the nation.”

Read More
  • scape-martinez
    Permalink Gallery

    CRYP Welcomes Acclaimed Artist Scape Martinez to Cheyenne River

CRYP Welcomes Acclaimed Artist Scape Martinez to Cheyenne River

Earlier this month, CRYP welcomed San Jose, California-based artist Scape Martinez to its East Lincoln Street campus for a week of mural painting and youth arts education. During the week prior to Labor Day, Martinez painted a mural on Eagle Butte’s Main Street, painted a second one in CRYP’s Waniyetu Wowapi (“Winter Count”) Art Park, and engaged children of all ages in a special Youth Graffiti Jam.

An accomplished multidisciplinary artist and best-selling writer who has been involved in the graffiti art scene since the 1980s, Martinez has pushed the boundaries of both graffiti and street art, bringing them firmly into the fine art, public art and educational arenas. He also has written four books on creating graffiti-style urban art, and he frequently conducts workshops and lectures for teenagers, fellow artists and educators.

During the jam on September 4, Martinez worked with children on small can control exercises, teaching basic can control and effects. According to Tammy Eagle Hunter, CRYP’s youth programs director, one of the jam participants surprised everyone.

Read More
  • 09052014 46 EAST
    Permalink Gallery

    RedCan Graffiti Jam Will Feature Artists from Across U.S., Plus Skateboard Exhibition

RedCan Graffiti Jam Will Feature Artists from Across U.S., Plus Skateboard Exhibition

It’s almost here. Indian country’s first-ever graffiti jam is just three weeks away, and it’s built incredible momentum. The Cheyenne River Youth Project® staff reports that acclaimed artists, valued supporters and friends will converge on Eagle Butte, South Dakota, from around the world.

The revolutionary arts event, titled RedCan, is scheduled for July 8-9 in Eagle Butte on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation, where activities will take place in CRYP’s 5-acre Waniyetu Wowapi (“Winter Count”) Art Park and at select sites around the community. From there, artists will head west for a second RedCan event in Rapid City’s Art Alley.

Headline artists include East Foster from Denver (pictured here), Kazilla from Miami, Meme from southern California, Tyler “Siamese” Read from Rapid City, and Peyton Scott Russell, Biafra Inc. and Wundr from Minnesota’s Twin Cities. Also on hand will be a variety of native and non-native artists, hip-hop groups, native drum groups and native dancers.

Read More
  • IMG_0784
    Permalink Gallery

    Interns Learn Arts of Stenciling & Paper Collage From Acclaimed Guest Instructors

Interns Learn Arts of Stenciling & Paper Collage From Acclaimed Guest Instructors

The Cheyenne River Youth Project®’s first cohort art interns had a busy spring, studying the history of graffiti and street art, learning the art of creative lettering, and exploring how community art parks like CRYP’s new, 5-acre Waniyetu Wowapi (“Winter Count”) Art Park can be tools for critical change. In late April, the six art interns delved into stenciling with guest instructor Biafra Inc., an accomplished stencil artist based in Minnesota’s Twin Cities; currently, they are working on collage with fellow Minneapolis-based artist and art instructor Peyton Scott Russell.

During his April course at CRYP’s East Lincoln Street campus, Biafra introduced the staff and interns to common stenciling tools such as knives, papers and paints, and then they had an opportunity to practice making lines and curves. They worked on understanding, locating and cutting bridges — the most complicated part of the process — and practiced on images and letters that would be used in their final project.

Read More
  • IMG_3983
    Permalink Gallery

    Teen Interns Learn Graffiti Art from Some of the Country’s Top Talent

Teen Interns Learn Graffiti Art from Some of the Country’s Top Talent

The Cheyenne River Youth Project®’s first art interns are now deeply involved in their internship coursework, thanks to several renowned professional artists who are teaching them the basics of graffiti and street art. They include lead instructor Peyton Scott Russell, a Minneapolis-based artist and art instructor; Tyler “Siamese” Read, an artist who also serves as the arts education engagement coordinator for the Rapid City Arts Council; and Biafra Inc., who also is based in the Twin Cities and has exhibited his work around the world.

Peyton (as he is known professionally) taught “Graffiti: The Art of Creative Lettering” at the CRYP campus on March 27-28. During the three-session course, he shared the method he developed to help fledgling art students understand structure, balance and space for drawing and painting letters. And it involves much more than writing.

Read More

CRYP Offers Art Classes for New Outdoor Art Park

graffiticlass  graffiti2

The Cheyenne River Youth Project is proud to announce that they will soon open a new outdoor art park on its campus. To launch the new space, CRYP hosted the Art of Creative Lettering classes with renowned graffiti artist Peyton Russell. The classes the week of May 12th to the 16th from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. The week concluded with an art show on Saturday, May 17th at the new park. The graffiti wall and outdoor art space which will be open to teens to create works of their own. Art supplies for the classes will be provided by CRYP.

“We think the community could benefit from setting up a space for kids to express themselves with art,” says Julie Garreau, executive director of CRYP. “Every community needs an open space to for the kids to reflect who they are and the world around them. We hope that these classes will give them the confidence and inspiration to explore their artistic freedom.”

“Graffiti is an art form, just like any other,” says Tammy Eagle Hunter, who is youth programs director for CRYP and also an artist herself. “It can be a really positive outlet for kids to be able to get outside and paint, make mistakes and try new things and learn that art is art – it doesn’t have to be in a frame to call it art.”

“[This class] is focused on the advancement and development of Graffiti Art and its esthetic value as an educational program,” Peyton wrote on his website.  “This program seeks out support by building partnerships with artists, teachers, business owners, city officials, arts organizations, community leaders, parents, and students to address and discuss culture, opportunity, possibility and the process of graffiti writing for teaching its artistic principles.”

For more information about Peyton Russell and his work, please visit http://houseofdaskarone.com/.

Founded in 1988, the Cheyenne River Youth Project is dedicated to providing the youth of the Cheyenne River reservation with access to a vibrant and secure future through a variety of culturally sensitive and enduring programs, projects and facilities, ensuring strong, self-­sufficientfamilies and communities. Today, CRYP provides a wide variety of programs and services to the community, covering nearly 3 million acres in South Dakota. To learn more about CRYP, visit www.lakotayouth.org.

Read More