605-964-8200|lakotayouth@gmail.com

Monthly Archives: May 2016

  • DQ Fundraiser 2012
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    “Sweet Tooth for Lakota Youth” Fundraiser is Coming Up on June 5-11

“Sweet Tooth for Lakota Youth” Fundraiser is Coming Up on June 5-11

For the seventh year in a row, the local Dairy Queen in Eagle Butte, South Dakota, is planning to host its popular “Sweet Tooth for Lakota Youth” fundraising event to benefit the Cheyenne River Youth Project®. From Sunday, June 5 to Saturday, June 11, $1 of every malt, shake, Blizzard and Orange Julius purchase will be donated to CRYP.

Once again, DQ owners Lonnie and Jackie Heier are hoping to raise $2,000 to benefit CRYP’s youth programming and services, and to raise awareness about the nearly 28-year-old, not-for-profit, grassroots youth project’s ongoing mission in the Cheyenne River community.

The best part is, you don’t have to live near the Eagle Butte DQ to participate in the fundraiser. Donors around the country can contribute this year, thanks to the 20th anniversary of Midnight Basketball, one of the most-loved, successful teen programs on the Cheyenne River Lakota reservation.

“This is an important milestone for CRYP, and to commemorate it, we want to give a Dairy Queen Blizzard to every teen who participates in our 20th Anniversary Celebration this July,” said Tammy Eagle Hunter, CRYP’s youth programs director.

So, from now through June 11, supporters can make a GoFundMe contribution to support “Sweet Tooth for Lakota Youth.” Every $4 donated will go toward the purchase of a DQ Blizzard for a young person who participates in the Midnight Basketball program. And, for every Blizzard sold, the local Dairy Queen will donate $1 back to CRYP to benefit its ongoing youth programming.

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The Sioux Chef is Coming on June 10!

The Cheyenne River Youth Project® has announced that it will welcome “The Sioux Chef” Sean Sherman to its Eagle Butte campus on Friday, June 10. The chef is spending the day at CRYP courtesy of the nonprofit, grassroots youth project’s “Learning to Eat Like Our Ancestors” initiative.

In the morning, Sherman will lead an entrepreneurism workshop, which will be open to CRYP’s teen interns as well as to members of the local community. In the afternoon, he will host a cooking class for up to 20 people with sampling for attendees. Once again, the offering will be available to teen interns and community members.

In the entrepreneurism workshop, Sherman will discuss how to start a restaurant or catering company. Topics include developing a business plan, menu testing, hiring essential help, creating a marketing plan, generating startup capital, writing employee materials, keeping an eye on labor and food costs, and how to address the inevitable bumps in the road.

In the cooking class, the chef will talk about applying traditional Native American techniques and knowledge, and participants will gain hands-on experience with traditional foods—including bison—and practice recipes. Topics for discussion include Sherman’s ethnobotanical and anthropological research and how to use traditional techniques in modern cooking.

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May Hall of Fame: Serena Eagle

Before the Cheyenne River Youth Project® was founded in 1988, children growing up on the Cheyenne River Lakota reservation didn’t have many options for safe, positive places to go outside of school. When CRYP opened the doors to its Main youth center, 4- to 12-year-olds finally had their own space for playing, learning, and enjoying healthy meals and snacks.

When the Cokata Wiconi (Center of Life) teen center opened in 2006, local teens were able to take advantage of the same opportunities. Not only could they socialize with friends, get homework help, play sports and get something to eat, they could learn valuable new skills, have access to mentors, gain valuable experience and insights, and pursue their passions in a way that leads to greater successes in higher education, in careers and in life.

How does CRYP measure success? It looks toward its “regulars,” teens who grow and blossom in so many ways during their years at Cokata Wiconi. Serena Eagle, 16, is a perfect example. She has been coming to the teen center for three years; while playing basketball in the Morgan Yellowhead Gymnasium was the initial draw, Serena now actively participates in CRYP’s ongoing teen fitness classes and in its innovative, edgy arts programming.

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  • 2016 Garden Blessing 2
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    CRYP Hosts Garden Blessing, Launches 2016 Growing Season in Winyan Toka Win Garden

CRYP Hosts Garden Blessing, Launches 2016 Growing Season in Winyan Toka Win Garden

On Friday, May 6, the Cheyenne River Youth Project® formally blessed the 2-acre, naturally grown Winyan Toka Win (Leading Lady) garden for the 2016 growing season. Richard Charging Eagle conducted the garden blessing, and 12 young people joined staff members in planting corn for the season.

Next on deck: planting potatoes; getting the starter squash in and covering them with squash guards; and, once the garden’s landscape plan is complete, planting fruit trees and kiwi bushes along the fence at the end of Winyan Toka Win’s north-facing rows. There, they’ll receive plenty of sun and eventually will serve as a windbreak. A watering system will give each tree and bush a root well and drip line.

Julie Garreau, CRYP’s executive director, said staff and youth alike are eager to plant the fruit trees and bushes, which will be espaliered.

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  • Winter at Cokata Wiconi
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    Heat Assistance Program Aids 190 Cheyenne River Families This Winter and Spring

Heat Assistance Program Aids 190 Cheyenne River Families This Winter and Spring

On May 6, the Cheyenne River Youth Project® officially concluded its Heat Assistance Program for the 2015-16 winter season. The program provided much-needed matching funds to 190 families on South Dakota’s remote, 2.8-million-acre Cheyenne River Lakota reservation during the cold winter and spring months.

Nearly 200 families translates to more than 1,000 individuals, and more than half of them children. Their families were able to request matching grants up to $100 to help cover the cost of propane, electricity or firewood when they most needed it. Through its Family Services program, CRYP processed the requests and worked with local providers to ensure that each family received assistance as quickly as possible.

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  • Wellness Interns 1
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    CRYP is Accepting Applications for Summer Teen Internships Through May 27

CRYP is Accepting Applications for Summer Teen Internships Through May 27

The Cheyenne River Youth Project® has announced that it will be accepting applications for its summer teen internship programs through Friday, May 27. Internship opportunities include wellness, social enterprise and sustainable agriculture; CRYP is offering three 80-hour internships during the summer season, with each session running approximately two to three weeks.

During their internships, participating teens will participate in classes and trainings, they’ll be involved in event planning and youth mentorship, and they’ll gain valuable job and life skills that will serve them well beyond high school. Those who complete their 80 hours each will earn a stipend of $500.

These aren’t simply summer jobs, however. According to Julie Garreau, CRYP’s executive director, CRYP’s internship programs are carefully designed for Lakota youth.

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    CRYP Announces Fundraiser, Headliners for 2016 RedCan Graffiti Jam

CRYP Announces Fundraiser, Headliners for 2016 RedCan Graffiti Jam

The Cheyenne River Youth Project®’s acclaimed RedCan graffiti jam is just eight weeks away, and staff members have launched a Crowdrise campaign (crowdrise.com/redcangraffitijam2016) to raise the much-needed funds to cover the costs of paint, art supplies, food and beverages, and artists’ travel expenses. And they’re not doing it alone — several artists have made financial contributions, and headlining artist Scribe is selling his “Cante Iyapapi” prints through the CRYP gift shop and online at scribeswalk.com to help support the RedCan fundraising effort.

Twenty-five signed 18×24 prints are available, and 100 percent of the proceeds will benefit CRYP. Scribe said he’s happy to do whatever he can to support the youth project as it pursues its ongoing mission in the Cheyenne River community.

“A lot of my life has been trying to make something bigger out of something that starts small,” he explained. “It seems like CRYP has a similar situation. I admire that type of spirit, and I admire people who invest in the well-being of others. There are a lot of jams currently being used to ultimately help real estate and make an area hip. This is more about uplifting a community as a whole.”

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