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Monthly Archives: May 2015

  • At Bear Butte Lake
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    CRYP Receives National Park Service Grant for Youth Trip to Sacred Sites

CRYP Receives National Park Service Grant for Youth Trip to Sacred Sites

The Cheyenne River Youth Project® announced today that it has received National Park Service funds in the amount of $2,250. These funds will allow the 26-year-old, not-for-profit youth organization to organize a two-day youth trip to Devils Tower National Monument in Wyoming and Bear Butte State Park in South Dakota.

This NPS grant was made available to native not-for-profit and youth organizations so they could pursue initiatives that would connect young people to the places of their ancestors and introduce them to the work of the National Park Service. The funds provide vital assistance to offset the travel costs associated with getting native youth to NPS sites.

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  • Meme 5
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    RedCan Seeks to Inspire and Empower Native Youth — Especially Young Women

RedCan Seeks to Inspire and Empower Native Youth — Especially Young Women

Indian country’s first-ever graffiti jam is just six weeks away, but it’s not too late to support this ground-breaking initiative. The Cheyenne River Youth Project® is still raising funds, which staff will use to purchase paint, art supplies, food and beverages, and to help cover the artists’ travel expenses.

RedCan is scheduled for July 8-9 in Eagle Butte on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation, where activities will take place in CRYP’s 5-acre Waniyetu Wowapi (“Winter Count”) Art Park and at select sites around the community. From there, artists will head west for a second RedCan event in Rapid City’s Art Alley. At both locations, graffiti culture and Lakota culture will merge in powerful and unexpected ways.

According to Julie Garreau, CRYP’s executive director, the RedCan fundraiser is allowing art enthusiasts and supporters of native communities to come together to join an unprecedented international movement. “Most people don’t know that graffiti is the largest and longest-running art movement in human history,” she explained. “But it’s more than that. It’s truly a revolution, because graffiti art is a great equalizer, and it’s a source of meaningful empowerment for young people.

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May CRYP Hall of Fame: Mary Mitchell

Mary Mitchell, 21, was born and raised in Eagle Butte, South Dakota, and she is an enrolled member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. A 2011 graduate of Cheyenne-Eagle Butte High School, Mary just graduated with honors from Black Hills State University with a degree in elementary education.

“Ever since I was a little girl, I wanted to be a teacher,” Mary says. “It’s all I’ve ever wanted to do! Right after graduating from high school, I started substitute teaching in all grade levels, K-12; during every break from college, I would be subbing on Cheyenne River. During the summers, I taught summer school. All this experience only amplified my desire to be a teacher.”

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May Partner of the Month: Child Fund International

Child Fund International exists to help deprived, excluded and vulnerable children have the capacity to improve their lives and the opportunity to become young adults, parents and leaders who bring lasting and positive change in their communities. The organization, originally founded in 1938 to support orphaned children in China, promotes societies around the world whose individuals and institutions participate in valuing, protecting and advancing the worth and rights of children.

Over its 75-year history, CFI’s approach has evolved into one of community development — the idea that you can best help children by strengthening their families and community structures. That makes the international not-for-profit organization the perfect partner for the Cheyenne River Youth Project, according to Julie Garreau, CRYP’s executive director.

“We share a similar mission,” Garreau explained. “We, too, are dedicated to providing youth with access to a vibrant and secure future. Here on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation, that means ensuring that we can give our children from age 4 to age 18 a wide variety of culturally sensitive and enduring programs, projects and facilities right here in Eagle Butte.”

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  • STC 2015 group photo
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    CRYP Hosts Hopa Mountain’s “Strengthening the Circle” Youth Programming Conference

CRYP Hosts Hopa Mountain’s “Strengthening the Circle” Youth Programming Conference

Late last month, the Cheyenne River Youth Project® hosted a special edition of Hopa Mountain’s ongoing “Strengthening the Circle” training conferences at its East Lincoln Street campus. Twelve not-for-profit organizations attended the invitation-only April 27-29 event, which specifically focused on year-round, not-for-profit youth programming initiatives in South Dakota.

According to Julie Garreau, CRYP’s executive director, the goal for the Strengthening the Circle Youth Programming Conference was to bring together not-for-profit organizations that are pursuing similar missions in the face of similar challenges, and give those organizations a valuable opportunity to share information and best practices with each other. The conference also included a grant-writing element.

Conference participants participated in two webinars, shared their feedback and their thoughts on how to become stronger, and then completed grant applications. As Garreau noted, there were many teaching opportunities, but even more important was the event’s participatory, collaborative spirit.

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  • Winyan Toka Win 1
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    NOW HIRING! CRYP is Seeking a Full-Time Deputy Director with Focus on Development

NOW HIRING! CRYP is Seeking a Full-Time Deputy Director with Focus on Development

The Cheyenne River Youth Project® has announced that it is seeking a deputy director to join its staff full time. The salaried position will include benefits, with salary dependent on the select candidate’s qualifications.

The nearly 26-year-old, not-for-profit youth organization has experienced dramatic growth in recent years. Founded in 1988, CRYP began as a small, volunteer-run youth center for 4- to 12-year-olds in an old bar building on Eagle Butte’s Main Street; today, the youth project operates the new incarnation of The Main youth center (1999) as well as the Cokata Wiconi teen center (2006), the Winyan Toka Win organic garden (1999 – pictured here), the farm-to-table Keya Cafe (2014), the new Waniyetu Wowapi Art Park (2014), and the highly valued Family Services program (2002) at its East Lincoln Street campus.

“For us to continue pursuing our mission and long-term vision for CRYP as a holistic wellness facility for youth and an authentic gathering place for our community, we need a deputy director with a specific focus on development and growth activities,” said Julie Garreau, CRYP’s executive director. “And, we need that person to be willing to work with us here in Eagle Butte. He or she doesn’t have to live on the reservation, but home needs to be a reasonable commuting distance from our campus.”

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  • DQ Fundraiser 2012
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    6th Annual “Sweet Tooth for Youth” Fundraiser for CRYP Starts May 10, and You Can Help — Just Buy a Blizzard!

6th Annual “Sweet Tooth for Youth” Fundraiser for CRYP Starts May 10, and You Can Help — Just Buy a Blizzard!

Once again, the local Dairy Queen in Eagle Butte, South Dakota, is planning to its popular “Sweet Tooth for Youth” fundraising event to benefit the Cheyenne River Youth Project®. From Sunday, May 10 to Saturday, May 16, $1 of every malt, shake, Blizzard and Orange Julius purchase will be donated to CRYP.

The dual goals for the sixth annual fundraiser, according to DQ owners Lonnie and Jackie Heier, are to raise $2,000 to benefit youth programming and services, and to raise awareness about the 26-year-old, not-for-profit, grassroots youth project’s ongoing mission in the community.

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