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Monthly Archives: April 2015

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    CRYP Receives Mini-Grant from First Nations Development Institute

CRYP Receives Mini-Grant from First Nations Development Institute

The Cheyenne River Youth Project® has received a Native Arts Capacity Building Initiative mini-grant from the First Nations Development Institute in Longmont, Colorado. This $2,000 professional development grant, made possible through the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation, will ensure that the youth project’s staff receives critical arts training this year to support its ongoing youth arts programming.

In the next two months, six staff members will learn graffiti and street art history and techniques, and they will work with local artists to learn traditional Lakota beading styles and quill work. They also will work with local pottery artists to become more familiar with basic pottery techniques and all the necessary equipment.

“We’re thrilled to receive this grant from the First Nations Development Institute,” said Julie Garreau, CRYP’s executive director. “These funds will allow us to continue building our arts initiatives here at our campus, from our summer arts program to our many arts-related activities and events throughout the year.

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    Teen Interns Learn Graffiti Art from Some of the Country’s Top Talent

Teen Interns Learn Graffiti Art from Some of the Country’s Top Talent

The Cheyenne River Youth Project®’s first art interns are now deeply involved in their internship coursework, thanks to several renowned professional artists who are teaching them the basics of graffiti and street art. They include lead instructor Peyton Scott Russell, a Minneapolis-based artist and art instructor; Tyler “Siamese” Read, an artist who also serves as the arts education engagement coordinator for the Rapid City Arts Council; and Biafra Inc., who also is based in the Twin Cities and has exhibited his work around the world.

Peyton (as he is known professionally) taught “Graffiti: The Art of Creative Lettering” at the CRYP campus on March 27-28. During the three-session course, he shared the method he developed to help fledgling art students understand structure, balance and space for drawing and painting letters. And it involves much more than writing.

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April Partner of the Month: FriendSwap

Over the years, fundraisers for the Cheyenne River Youth Project® in Eagle Butte, South Dakota, have taken many forms. One such fundraiser stands out.

For 13 years, FriendSwap in Washington, D.C., has played match-maker for hundreds upon hundreds of young professionals — and donated the proceeds to the 26-year-old youth project. This spring, 735 single Washingtonians attended the 13th annual FriendSwap party and raised close to $14,000 to support CRYP’s youth programming and services (pictured here: Spanish class at The Main, CRYP’s youth center for 4- to 12-year-olds).

FriendSwap was founded by attorney and Cheyenne River Sioux tribal member Heather Dawn Thompson in 2002. Today, it’s led by national best-selling author Kerry Reichs.

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Support RedCan Graffiti Jam Today Through Crowdrise!

South Dakota’s Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation comprises two of the poorest counties in the United States, yet it is imaginably rich with the strong, beautiful, enduring Lakota culture. In a sense, Lakota culture and graffiti culture have much in common — graffiti culture also has proven to be so powerful that the poverty in which it has been immersed cannot hold it back.

These two worlds will collide for the first time this summer at RedCan, Indian country’s first-ever graffiti jam. The event will take place on July 8-9 in CRYP’s Waniyetu Wowapi (“Winter Count”) Art Park in Eagle Butte and on July 11 at Art Alley in Rapid City. And the 26-year-old, not-for-profit, grassroots youth project has launched a Crowdrise campaign to help raise funds.

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April CRYP Hall of Fame: Anthony Potter

Enrolled Cheyenne River Sioux tribal member Anthony Potter grew up in Eagle Butte, South Dakota, in the heart of the 2.8-million-acre Cheyenne River reservation. His house was just down the street from the original “Main” youth center, founded in 1988 in a defunct Main Street bar.

The Cheyenne River Youth Project’s original Main was an all-volunteer-run organization dedicated to providing 4- to 12-year-olds with a safe place to play, do homework and enjoy meals and snacks after school and on Saturdays. And Anthony says it definitely filled a need in the community.

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2015 Passion for Fashion Serves 165 Teens

For 14 years, the Cheyenne River Youth Project® has celebrated the strength, achievements and limitless potential of the young ladies who live on South Dakota’s remote, 2.8-million-acre Cheyenne River reservation through a special annual program called “Passion for Fashion.” The 26-year-old, not-for-profit youth organization started Passion for Fashion in 2001 to ensure that Cheyenne River’s teens would have everything they need for prom night; this year, the beloved springtime program served 165 young people.

A significant number of the teens attended CRYP’s signature “Passion for Fashion” event on Saturday, March 14. The rest visited the youth project’s East Lincoln Street campus afterward, as schedules allowed. All were able to choose their dream dresses, shoes, jewelry and other accessories for this year’s high school prom.

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